Patellar Tendinitis Recovery Time: What You Need To Know

Monday, 16 November 2015  |  John

Patellar Tendinitis is a tear or other injury to the patellar tendon – the ligament connecting your knee and your shinbone. It’s also known as jumpers’ knee, because it’s most commonly found in athletes whose sports need a lot of jumping, such as basketball players.

There are a huge variety of things which can affect how long it takes you to recover from patellar tendinitis, and if you’re an athlete it can keep you out of the game for a long period of time.

Seriousness of the Injury

The biggest contributor to how long it takes for you to recover from patellar tendinitis is, unsurprisingly, how bad the condition is. If it’s particularly serious, you might need to go into surgery to correct the injury. Obviously, this has the longest recovery time and will keep you away from your game the longest. 

Because it’s so subjective, there’s no telling how long the recovery from surgery can take, although it’s important to note that surgery is only an option after having undergone all other treatment options, so it would basically take as long as all the other treatment options would, plus the surgery and the post-op recovery.

If your injury isn’t that serious, then you’ll probably be told to undergo a course of physical therapy which typically lasts between 4 to 6 weeks. 

How Your Recovery Goes

One of the biggest mistakes suffers of patellar tendinitis make is to go back into their usual fitness routine too quickly once the pain goes away. Even though there’s no more pain, your patellar tendinitis is still going through the healing process, and aggravating it with your usual exercise regime will only make it worse again.

Similarly, ignoring it will also only make the problem worse. Your patellar tendon needs time to rest and strengthen so that the proper healing process can occur.

How Much Exercise You Get

Another key factor which determines how long it takes for patellar tendinitis to heal is how much exercise it gets. While it shouldn’t be over-exerted and does need time to heal, not exercising patellar tendinitis at all will make it too weak to function even after the injury is gone. 

You should use your pain levels to judge how much it is safe to exercise your patellar tendinitis, and you should also follow the instructions of your doctor to ensure the injury heals as well as possible.

What Can I Do for Patellar Tendinitis?

One of the best things you can do for your condition is to buy an insole for patellar tendinitis. This helps to stabilise your foot, giving your patellar tendon a more stable and comfortable purchase so as to reduce further irritation and injury. 

If you’re interested in getting your hands on some shoe insoles for patellar tendinitis, head on over to Shoe Insoles and check out our range of Insoles for Patellar Tendinitis.

  • Ergonomic and light weight for optimal comfort
  • 2mm thick insoles fit into most shoes
  • Advanced Arch Support and Shock Absorption
  • Ideal for all sports & activities

  • Excellent shock absorption and impact protection due to air pocket cushioning
  • Reinforced stability plate and arch support gives medium to maximum arch support
  • Slim design to fit into all sports shoes or shoes with removable insoles
  • Optimized cushioning & stability ideal for high impact sports

  • Energy rebound foam;
  • Reinforced stability plate;
  • Encapsulated air chambers;
  • Optimized cushioning & stability.

Total: £0.00
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